Showing all 10 results

  • Fault Lines: The Social Justice Movement and Evangelicalism’s Looming Catastrophe

    $12.99

    NOTE: Kindle version sold only.

    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.

    The death of George Floyd at the hands of police in the summer of 2020 shocked the nation. As riots rocked American cities, Christians affirmed from the pulpit and in social media that “black lives matter” and that racial justice “is a gospel issue.”

    But what if there is more to the social justice movement than those Christians understand? Even worse: What if they’ve been duped into preaching ideas that actually oppose the Kingdom of God?

    In this powerful book, Voddie Baucham, a preacher, professor, and cultural apologist, explains the sinister worldview behind the social justice movement and Critical Race Theory—revealing how it already has infiltrated some seminaries, leading to internal denominational conflict, canceled careers, and lost livelihoods. Like a fault line, it threatens American culture in general—and the evangelical church in particular.

    Whether you’re a layperson who has woken up in a strange new world and wonders how to engage sensitively and effectively in the conversation on race or a pastor who is grappling with a polarized congregation, this book offers the clarity and understanding to either hold your ground or reclaim it.

  • Dabney On Fire: A Theology of Parenting, Education, Feminism, and Government

    $11.99

    NOTE: Kindle version sold only.

    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.

    Robert Lewis Dabney (1820–1898) was one of America’s greatest theologians. He was a Southern Presbyterian pastor, professor, philosopher, chaplain, church leader, author, and biographer of Stonewall Jackson. Among Dabney’s many gifts was his ability to predict the future, which resulted from his razor-sharp logic and thorough understanding of the world around him. Nowhere was Dabney more prophetic than in his writings on public theology, where he sought to apply the Bible to cultural and political issues in society. In addition to an introductory chapter, Dabney On Fire contains four of Robert Lewis Dabney’s greatest essays, in which he expounds upon the significance of parents, the failure of public schools, the dangers of feminism, and the limits of civil government. Dabney’s fiery style shines through, as this first-rate thinker and conservative stalwart puts forth the Bible’s teaching on these issues and critiques his opposition. These essays will inspire parents of young children, equip Christians dealing with secular thought, and challenge all who assume modern views of equality.

  • Private Law

    $9.99
    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.
    Here is F.J. Stahl’s detailed outworking in private law of the principles of law developed in Book II. In it, the rights of man receive full explanation within the context of higher, God-given legal principles. Hence, human rights do not form the cornerstone of the legal system. They rather serve as a secondary principle, subservient to a higher law. The further outworking of this concept in rights of property, contract, the law of the family, is masterfully laid out. Institutions such as property and marriage are not made the creature of will and contract but are fully explained as given realities which the human will cannot alter. This book constitutes a return to sound principles of private law and an antidote to contemporary emotivism and primacy of the will.
  • The Great Debate

    $11.99

    An acclaimed portrait of Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the origins of modern conservatism and liberalism

    In The Great Debate, Yuval Levin explores the roots of the left/right political divide in America by examining the views of the men who best represented each side at its origin: Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine. Striving to forge a new political path in the tumultuous age of the American and French revolutions, these two ideological titans sparred over moral and philosophical questions about the nature of political life and the best approach to social change: radical and swift, or gradual and incremental. The division they articulated continues to shape our political life today.

    Essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the basis of our political order and Washington’s acrimonious rifts today, The Great Debate offers a profound examination of what conservatism, progressivism, and the debate between them truly amount to.

  • The Doctrine of State & The Principles of State Law

    $25.89
    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.
    Friedrich Julius Stahl was one of Germany’s leading constitutional scholars in the 19th century, prior to the advent of Bismarck and the establishment of a united Germany. The Doctrine of State and the Principles of State Law is the centerpiece of his magnum opus, the Philosophy of Law. This is the first English-language translation of this key work of legal and political philosophy. It is written from a Christian and conservative background, but cognizant of and generous toward the liberal mainstream of constitutional opinion that characterized his day. Historians, legal scholars, and philosophical fellow-travelers all will gain greatly by perusing this magnificent yet forgotten work.
  • Principles of Law

    $14.99

    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.

    The first installment of the multivolume Philosophy of Law by Friedrich Julius Stahl (1802-1861), the greatest work of confessionally Christian jurisprudence ever written. The Principles of Law presents the core ideas of Stahl’s common-law system.

  • Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Debate

    $12.99

    NOTE: Kindle version sold only.

    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.

    A brief magisterial introduction to the conservative tradition by one of Britain’s leading intellectuals.

    In Conservatism, Roger Scruton offers the reader an invitation into the world of political philosophy by explaining the history and evolution of the conservative movement over the centuries. With the clarity and authority of a gifted teacher, he discusses the ideology’s perspective on civil society, the rule of law, freedom, morality, property, rights, and the role of the state. In a time when many claim that conservatives lack a unified intellectual belief system, this book makes a very strong case to the contrary, one that politically-minded readers will find compelling and refreshing.

    Scruton analyzes the origins and development of conservatism through the philosophies and thoughts of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Adam Smith and Milton Friedman, among others. He shows how conservative ideas have influenced the political sector through the careers of a diverse cast of politicians, such as Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Disraeli, Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. He also takes a close look at the changing relationship between conservative politics, capitalism, and free markets in both the UK and the US. This clear, incisive guide is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand Western politics and policies, now and over the last three centuries.

  • Authority Not Majority

    $12.99
    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.
    Virtually unknown apart from specialist scholars, Friedrich Julius Stahl was a leading German philosopher, professor of constitutional law, and statesman in 19th century Germany. His Christian political philosophy both impacted practical politics in a time of upheaval in Germany (around and after 1848), and influenced anti-revolutionary thinkers of subsequent generations. His work is a monument to a Germany that was overwhelmed and subsumed by the Bismarck revolution, which substituted Realpolitik for Christian tradition. His biography in English is long overdue.
  • The Recovery of Natural Law

    $12.99
    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.

    As the world reels from crisis to crisis, the most serious one seems to draw the least attention. And that is the crisis of the Western mind. The seeds of radical subjectivism sown at the time of a previous such crisis, chronicled in Paul Hazard’s Crisis of the European Mind, have now borne fruit, fruit of such stupendous magnitude that they threaten to drag us down into the depths of cultural despair.

    In The Rise and Fall of Natural Law, this descent into the maelstrom was chronicled from its origin to its inevitable conclusion – at least, in the world of intellect. Culture lags intellect, but it is never insulated from it. Ideas do have consequences. The intellectual counterpart to our cultural crisis already played itself out 200 years ago. And the crisis of the European mind, by which intellectual culture shifted from Revelation to Reason, found its fitting conclusion in the work of the ultimate solipsist, Johann Gottlieb Fichte. Fichte’s focus on enthusiastic conviction and the primacy of the subjective makes him the prophet of the modern world. Indeed, his orientation has now triumphed for all to see. His story, and the stories of those leading up to him – the leading characters in “the Rise and Fall of Natural Law” – are crucial to understanding the genesis of the modern world.

    But that is not the end of the story, for history goes on. That spot, precisely where the first half of Stahl’s history of legal philosophy leaves off, is where the second half picks up. The Recovery of Historical Law narrates the attempts to overcome this radical subjectivism and establish a functioning social order in which the ideal matches up with the real, the theory is in harmony with the practice.

    After discussing the work of Locke, Montesquieu, Constant, and the Doctrinaires, all of whom functioned fully within the framework of autonomous natural law while attempting to mitigate it, Stahl reveals the hero of the story: Friedrich Schelling. It was Schelling who initiated the gargantuan task of reorienting philosophy away from subjectivism and back toward objective reality. Stahl characterizes this as a “Samsonesque act” whereby Schelling “lifted the temple of the previous philosophy off of its pillars and buried the whole army of enemies, himself included, under its ruins.”

    For one thing, this explains the cover illustration, “Samson Destroying the Philistine Temple.” For another, it intimates how Schelling, like Moses, stood at the entry to the Promised Land without entering in. Schelling’s philosophy is an exercise in pantheism, an orientation from which he struggled to free himself later in life. And in fact, Hegel, his great fellow laborer in so-called “speculative philosophy,” took that pantheism and turned it into a mighty system in its own right. A rabbit trail that carried many into another dead end, one with which we wrestle today: “conscious” or “woke” big government.

    But that is not the end of the story. Schelling’s first fruits were recovered by the Historical School of Jurisprudence, led by Friedrich Carl von Savigny. Here the work of Counter-Revolutionaries such as Joseph de Maistre and Edmund Burke was carried forward to bear fruit for jurisprudence. And this is the foundation for Stahl’s own system, as contained in Volume II: The Doctrine of Law and State on the Basis of the Christian World-View. It is on this basis that the laborious task to reconstruct Western civilization can begin. And not a moment too soon.

  • The Rise and Fall of Natural Law

    $12.99
    Want to receive a free copy? Learn how to earn points.

    A rejection of God has produced a rejection of natural law. Relativism reigns the day. But natural law itself also laid the path for contemporary subjectivism. Natural law was believed to represent an objective criteria for assessing human-made law. It ended up abolishing it. The Rise and Fall of Natural Law explains how this happened.

    Stahl traces this path from ancient antiquity through medieval scholasticism, Enlightenment secularization, and finally Rousseau’s theory and the brutal reality of the French Revolution. The Rise and Fall of Natural Law belongs on the bookshelf of every serious Christian thinker.